Top 10 Le CorbusIer Structures
Top 10 Le CorbusIer Structures

Le Corbusier was born Charles-Edouard Jeanneret-Gris in Switzerland on October 6, 1887. In 1917, he moved to Paris and assumed the pseudonym Le Corbusier. In his architecture, he chiefly built with steel and reinforced concrete and worked with elemental geometric forms. Le Corbusier’s painting emphasized clear forms and structures, which corresponded to his architecture. We will show you Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

1-Villa Savoye

Villa Savoye is a modernist villa in Poissy, on the outskirts of Paris, France. It was designed by the Swiss architects Le Corbusier and his cousin, Pierre Jeanneret and built between 1928 and 1931 using reinforced concrete.

Vlla Savoye

As an exemplar of Le Corbusier’s “five points” for new constructions, the villa is representative of the origins of modern architecture and is one of the most easily recognizable and renowned examples of the International style.

Villa Savoye

The house was originally built as a country retreat for the Savoye family. After being purchased by the neighbouring school, it became the property of the French state in 1958. After surviving several proposals to demolish it, it was designated as an official French historical monument in 1965 (a rare event, as Le Corbusier was still living at the time). It was thoroughly renovated between 1985 and 1997, and the refurbished house is now open to visitors year-round under the care of the Centre des monuments nationaux.

Villa Savoye, Plan

In July 2016, the house and several other works by Le Corbusier were registered as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. I think Vila Savoye is the first one in Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

Le Corbusier with Villa Savoye Model

2-Notre-Dame du Haut

Notre-Dame du Haut  is a Roman Catholic chapel in Ronchamp, France. Built in 1955, it is one of the finest examples of the architecture of Franco-Swiss architect Le Corbusier. The chapel is a working religious building and is under the guardianship of the private foundation Association de l’Œuvre de Notre-Dame du Haut. It attracts 80,000 visitors each year.

Notre-Dame du Haut
Notre-Dame du Haut

Structure

The structure is made mostly of concrete and is comparatively small, enclosed by thick walls, with the upturned roof supported on columns embedded within the walls, like a sail billowing in the windy currents on the hill top. In the interior, the spaces left between the walls and roof are filled with clerestory windows, as well as the asymmetric light from the wall openings, serve to further reinforce the sacred nature of the space and reinforce the relationship of the building with its surroundings. The lighting in the interior is soft and indirect, from the clerestory windows and reflecting off the whitewashed walls of the chapels with projecting towers.

Notre-Dame du Haut
Notre-Dame du Haut

Roof

Much like the church at Sainte Marie de La Tourette, the roof of Notre Dame du Haut appears to float above the walls. This is possible, because it is supported by concrete columns, not the walls themselves. The effect produced allows a strip of light to enter the building, thus lighting the space further, and making the church feel more open.

Notre-Dame du Haut, Plan
Notre-Dame du Haut, Plan

This billowing concrete roof was planned to slope toward the back, where a fountain of abstract forms is placed on the ground. When it rains, the water comes pouring off the roof and down onto the raised, slanted concrete structures, creating a dramatic natural fountain.

Notre-Dame du Haut
Notre-Dame du Haut

3-Ville Radieuse

ille radieuse was an unrealised project designed by the French-Swiss architect Le Corbusier in 1930. It constitutes one of the most influential and controversial urban doctrines of European modernism.

Ville Radieuse

Although Le Corbusier had exhibited his ideas for the ideal city, the Ville contemporaine in the 1920s, during contact with international planners he began work on the Ville Radieuse. In 1930 he had become an active member of the syndicalist movement and proposed the Ville radieuse as a blueprint of social reform.

Ville Radieuse

The principles of the Ville radieuse were incorporated into his later publication, the Athens Charter published in 1933.

Ville Radieuse

His utopian ideal formed the basis of a number of urban plans during the 1930s and 1940s culminating in the design and construction of the first Unité d’habitation in Marseille in 1952. I think Ville Radieuse is the second one in Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

Ville Radieuse, Plan

4-Sainte Marie de La Tourette

Sainte Marie de La Tourette is a Dominican Order priory, located on a hillside near Lyon, France designed by the architect Le Corbusier, the architect’s final and most important building. The design of the building begun in May 1953 and completed in 1961. The committee that decided the creation of the building considered that the primary duty of the monastery should be the spiritual awakening of the people and in particular the inhabitants of nearby areas. That’s why the monastery was placed in Eveux-sur-Arbresle, which is just 25 km from Lyon and is accessible by train or car.

Sainte Marie de La Tourette
Sainte Marie de La Tourette

In July 2016, the building and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Architecture

Sainte Marie de La Tourette
Sainte Marie de La Tourette

Exterior:

The monastery consists of four perimeter heavy rectangular structures that create a closed interior space. The one volume that is compact and rests on the edge of the hill houses the church and the church sacrifice, while the other three wings that are created are raised with pilotis of many different shapes and accommodating living spaces and all the rest functions of the monastery. It has been compared by critics to a parking garage.

Sainte Marie de La Tourette
Sainte Marie de La Tourette

Interior:

Sainte Marie de La Tourette
Sainte Marie de La Tourette

The monastery was designed to have one hundred bedrooms for apprentices and teachers, study rooms, one workplace and one entertainment room, a dining room, a library and a church. At the lowest level are the dining room and the peristyle of the temple in the form of a cross, that functions as ramp and leads to the church. The study, work, entertainment and library halls are placed on the above level, while the monks’ cells are at the highest level. Between the four wings surrounding the monastery, an enclosure is created space. I think Sainte Marie de La Tourette is the 3. one in Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

Sainte Marie de La Tourette, Plan
Sainte Marie de La Tourette, Plan

5-Villa La Roche

Villa La Roche, also Maison La Roche, is a house in Paris, designed by Le Corbusier and his cousin Pierre Jeanneret in 1923–1925. It was designed for Raoul La Roche, a Swiss banker from Basel and collector of avant-garde art. Villa La Roche now houses the Fondation Le Corbusier.

Villa La RocheVilla La RocheVilla La Roche

La Roche commissioned Le Corbusier to build a villa as well as a gallery to house his art collection.

In July 2016, the house, Villa Jeanneret, and sixteen other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Design and construction

Villa La Roche

La Roche-Jeanneret house, is a pair of semi-detached houses that was Corbusier’s third commission in Paris. They are laid out at right angles to each other. The house exhibits cubist art and purism. The house is designed to be experiential and viewed from a single, fixed point.

Furniture

Villa La Roche

In 1928, Le Corbusier and Perriand collaborated on furniture, the fruits of their collaboration were first done for Villa La Roche. The furniture items include, three chrome-plated tubular steel chairs designed for two of his projects, The Maison la Roche in Paris and a pavilion for Barbara and Henry Church. I think Villa La Roche is the best one Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

Villa La Roche, Plan

6-Cabanon de vacances

Cabanon de vacances
Cabanon de vacances

The Cabanon de vacances is a vacation home designed and built by noted architect Le Corbusier in 1951. It is the only place the architect Le Corbusier built for himself which he used for vacation. In July 2016, the home and several other works by Le Corbusier were inscribed as the world’s smallest UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Design and construction

Cabanon de vacances
Cabanon de vacances

Le Corbusier loved his summer home for its location. He drowned in the Mediterranean while staying at his beloved cabin.I think Cabanon de vacances is the best one Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

Cabanon de vacances, Plan

7-Dom-Ino House

Dom-Ino House
Dom-Ino House

Dom-Ino House  is an open floor plan modular structure designed by noted architect Le Corbusier in 1914–1915.

History

Dom-Ino House
Dom-Ino House

It was a prototype as the physical platform for the mass production of housing. The name is a pun that combines an allusion to domus (Latin for house) and the pieces of the game of dominoes, because the floor plan resembled the game and because the units could be aligned in a series like dominoes, to make row houses of different patterns.

Design

Dom-Ino House
Dom-Ino House

This model proposed an open floor plan consisting of concrete slabs supported by a minimal number of thin, reinforced concrete columns around the edges, with a stairway providing access to each level on one side of the floor plan. The frame was to be completely independent of the floor plans of the houses thus giving freedom to design the interior configuration. The model eliminated load-bearing walls and the supporting beams for the ceiling.

Influence

This design became the foundation for most of his architecture for the next ten years I think Dom-Ino House is the 4. one in Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

Dom-Ino House
Dom-Ino House

8-National Museum of Western Art

The National Museum of Western Art  (NMWA) is the premier public art gallery in Japan specializing in art from the Western tradition.

The museum is located in the museum and zoo complex in Ueno Park in Taito, central Tokyo. It received 1,162,345 visitors in 2016

National Museum of Western Art

The Main Building was designed by the Swiss architect Charles-Edouard Jeanneret-Gris (1887–1965), who is more popularly known as Le Corbusier. It is the only representative example of his work in the Far East;[15] and the New York Times review of its opening suggested that the building itself presented an “artistic significance and beauty” which rivaled the paintings inside.[16] The multi-story, reinforced concrete building was completed in March 1959 as a symbol of the resumption of diplomatic ties between Japan and France after World War II.

Modulor

National Museum of Western Art, Model

In every element of the building Le Corbusier’s Modulor has been applied:

“The modular, which Le Corbusier developed after many years of research, is like a musical scale which gives order to the infinitude of possible musical pitches. Based on the size and proportions of the human body, it is a means of fitting architecture to the human spirit, of ordering the infinitude of possible proportions in such a way as to make them conform to the human shape. In the new Museum of Western Art, the modulor system has been observed in everything from the structural members to the architectural details and furnishings.” I think National Museum of Western Art is the best one Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures

– Tadayoshi, Fujiki, August 1959 “The Modular in the National Museum of Western Art” Japan Architect,

9-Villa Stein

Villa Stein, designed by Le Corbusier, was built in 1927 at Garches, France. The building is also known as Villa Garches, Villa de Monzie, and Villa Stein-de Monzie.

Villa Stein
Villa Stein

Located at 17 Rue de professeur Victor Pauchet, the villa was built for Gabrielle Colaco-Osorio de Monzie (1882–1961) and Sarah Stein, Sister-in-law of Gertrude Stein, between 1926 and 1928

Villa Stein
Villa Stein

10-Pavillon Le Corbusier

Pavillon Le Corbusier
Pavillon Le Corbusier

The Pavillon Le Corbusier is a Swiss art museum in Zürich-Seefeld at Zürichhorn dedicated to the work of the Swiss architect Le Corbusier. In 1960 Heidi Weber had the vision to establish a museum designed by Le Corbusier – this building should exhibit his works of art in an ideal environment created by the architect himself in the then Centre Le Corbusier or Heidi Weber Museum. In April 2014 the building and museum went over to the city of Zürich, and was renamed in May 2016.

Reorganisation and renovation

Pavillon Le Corbusier
Pavillon Le Corbusier

The listed pavilion will be renovated until spring 2019. From then on, the Museum für Gestaltung will operate the pavilion. A jury of experts unanimously chose the concept of the museum in September 2017 because it convinced with an “attractive, tailor-made programme for exhibitions and accompanying events”. In December 2016, the city parliament had approved operating subsidies of CHF 500,000 per annum for the new sponsorship for the years 2019 to 2022. In addition, the city will be exempted from rent of CHF 220,000 per annum.

Pavillon Le Corbusier, Plan

5 COMMENTS

  1. […] Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, and educator, whose creative period spanned more than 70 years, designing more than 1,000 structures, of which 532 were completed. Wright believed in designing structures that were in harmony with humanity and its environment, a philosophy he called organic architecture. This philosophy was best exemplified by Fallingwater (1935), which has been called “the best all-time work of American architecture.” As a founder of organic architecture, Wright played a key role in the architectural movements of the twentieth century, influencing three generations of architects worldwide through his works. We will show you Top 5 Frank Lloyd Wright Structures, and you can see Top 10 Le Corbusier Structures […]

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